This sums up my feelings on New York City pretty well…

Here is a quote from the blog of Scott Heiferman, CEO and Co-Founder of Meetup:

“New York is self-confident because it makes the TV commercials (who cares), it’s got Wall Street and hedge funds (no real value-creation), and Time Inc and Conde Nast are here (old farts). New York’s economy is made of increasingly irrelevant and/or unsustainable and/or uninteresting cash cows and cash machines.”

I grew up in a New York City suburb (Norwalk, Connecticut). Where I lived, everyone I knew thought that “The City” was the center of the universe. Most of the people I went to high school with attended college in the Northeast, migrated to New York after graduation, and would not consider living anywhere else.

I made the very unpopular decision to go to school in the South, in the fantastic city of Nashville, TN. Everyone thought I was crazy for not going to the Ivy League or another small New England college. Besides being incredibley ignorant, my friends made their decision to stay in NYC because they believe it runs the world. These people could not be more wrong.

Sometimes, I wish people in New York understood what both Scott and I know… because New York adds no real value to the economy (they buy and sell, instead of create), it has become bloated and increasingly irrelevant in the global business.

Besides, it is impossible to find any good pulled pork sandwiches.

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1 comment so far

  1. Fin De Fichier on

    Agree with your conclusions and that New Yorkers are often tiresome and self-important. For better or worse though, places like NYC have a certain “momentum” in terms of attracting the young and creative. Take “Improv Everywhere”. Although what they do probably isn’t, strictly speaking, unprecedented, you have to give the big-devil-apple his due and admit that it’s hard to imagine such a trend emerging anywhere else. I think you are right about the increasing irrelevance of NYC to “global business” but the jury is still out on the fate of its role in “global culture”.


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